School of Psychology - Directory - People - Dr Emma Collier-Baker

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Dr Emma Collier-Baker
  – Lecturer

Picture of 'Dr Emma Collier-Baker'
Dr Emma Collier-Baker
Room:
132
Email:
Fax:
+617 3365 4466
Webpage:
Postal Address:

Early Cognitive Development Centre

School of Psychology
University of Queensland
Brisbane QLD 4072
Australia

Username: emma
Picture of 'Dr Emma Collier-Baker'
Dr Emma Collier-Baker
Qualifications:

Ph.D. (University of Queensland, 2006)
B.A. Hons. I (University of Queensland, 2001)

Background:

News stories

http://www.uq.edu.au/news/?article=23704

Orangutans inspire major psychology project. UQ News (2011).

http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn16664-king-of-the-swingers-has-no-use-for-mirrors.html

King of the swingers has no use for mirrors. New Scientist (2009).

http://www.physorg.com/news75480255.html

Dogs cheated on famous intelligence test. Physorg (2006).

http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2004/09/06/1190799.html

Chimps know when they're being imitated. ABC Science (2004).

 

Professional Activities:

Awards

Endeavour Research Fellowship, 2009. Australian Government.

Australian Psychological Society Excellent PhD Thesis Award, 2006. Australian Psychological Society.

Queensland-Smithsonian Fellowship, 2006. Queensland Government and Smithsonian Institute, USA.

Frank A. Beach Comparative Psychology Award, 2005. American Psychological Association.

Faculty Award for Tutors, 2003: Award for teaching excellence. Faculty of Social and Behavioural Sciences, University of Queensland.

McElwain Prize for Best Individual Research Thesis in Honours Psychology, 2001: University of Queensland.

Picture of 'Dr Emma Collier-Baker'
Dr Emma Collier-Baker
Research Activities:

 

I am interested in developmental, comparative and evolutionary aspects of cognition. In our comparative lab group we are investigating the performance of children and primates on non-invasive behavioural tasks such as invisible displacement, imitation recognition, mirror self-recognition, planning, and means-ends reasoning. We conduct studies with chimpanzees, orangutans, gorillas, gibbons, and spider monkeys at various zoos in Australia, the USA and Indonesia. Young children are tested here in the Early Cognitive Development Centre in the School of Psychology.

For information on great apes in the wild see GRASP 

Representative Publications:

Collier-Baker, E. (in press). Learning: The Role of Experience. In Passer & Smith, Psychology: The Science of Mind and Behaviour. McGraw-Hill.

Hill, A., Collier-Baker, E., & Suddendorf, T. (in press). Inferential reasoning by exclusion in children (Homo sapiens). Journal of Comparative Psychology

Hill, A., Collier-Baker, E., & Suddendorf, T. (2011). Inferential Reasoning by Exclusion in Great Apes, Lesser Apes, and Spider Monkeys. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 125(1), 91–103.

Dong, A., Collier-Baker, E., & Suddendorf, T. (2010). Animal innovation:  a window into design thinking.  In K. Dorst, S. Stewart, I. Staudinger, B. Paton & A. Dong (Eds.), Design Thinking Research Symposium 8 (pp. 121-130). Sydney: DAB Documents.

Suddendorf, T., & Collier-Baker, E. (2009). The evolution of primate visual self-recognition: evidence of absence in lesser apes. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 276(1662), 1671-1677.

Suddendorf, T., Corballis, M. C., & Collier-Baker, E. (2009). How great is great ape foresight? Animal Cognition, 12(5), 751-754.

Collier-Baker, E., & Suddendorf, T. (2006). Do chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) and two-year-old children (Homo sapiens) understand double invisible displacement? Journal of Comparative Psychology, 120(2), 89-97.

Collier-Baker, E., Davis, J.M., Nielsen, M., & Suddendorf, T. (2005). Do chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) understand single invisible displacement? Animal Cognition, 9(1), 55-61.

Nielsen, M., Collier-Baker, E., Davis, J. M., & Suddendorf, T. (2005). Imitation recognition in a captive chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Animal Cognition, 8, 31-36.

Collier-Baker, E., Davis, J.M, & Suddendorf, T. (2004). Do dogs (Canis familiaris) understand invisible displacement? Journal of Comparative Psychology, 118(4), 421–433.

Collier-Baker, E., & Davis, J.M. (2003). Pretending and Imagination in Children and Animals. Anthrozöos, 15(4), 372-378. Edited by R. W. Mitchell. Cambridge University.

 

Course Coordinator:
  • Semester 1, 2013
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 1, 2012
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 1, 2011
    PSYC4991 - Advanced Seminar in Psych 1
Course Tutor:
  • Semester 2, 2010
    PSYC2050 - Learning and Cognition

Note: Coordinator roles prior to 2009 and tutor roles prior to 2006 are not included.

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