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Associate Professor Mark Nielsen
  – Associate Professor

Picture of 'Associate Professor Mark Nielsen'
Associate Professor Mark Nielsen
Room:
MC-456
Email:
Phone:
3365 6805
Fax:
3365 4466
Postal Address:

School of Psychology
University of Queensland
Brisbane, QLD
4072 Australia

Username: nielsen
Picture of 'Associate Professor Mark Nielsen'
Associate Professor Mark Nielsen
Qualifications:

BSc (Flinders University)

PostGradDip - Psychology (LaTrobe University)

PhD(LaTrobe University)

Post-doctoral Resarch Fellow (University of Queensland)

Background:

 

 

Professional Activities:

Member: Association for Psychological Science; Society for Research in Child Development; Australasian Human Development Association

Associate Editor: Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

Editorial Consultant: Child Development; Infant and Child Development

Ad Hoc Reviewer: Animal Cognition; Australian Journal of Psychology; Autism; Behavioral and Brain Sciences; Biological Reviews; Biology Letters; British Journal of Developmental Psychology; British Journal of Psychology; Child Development; Cognition; Cognitive Development; Current Biology; Developmental Psychology; Developmental Science; Ethology; Infancy; Infant Behaviour and Development; Infant and Child Development; Interaction Studies; International Journal of Behavioral Development; International Journal of Behavioral Medicine; International Journal of Disability, Development and Education; Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology; Journal of Comparative Psychology; Journal of Experimental Child Psychology; Journal of Comparative Psychology; Philosophical Transactions of The Royal Society; PLoS ONE; Psychological Bulletin; Psychological Science; Science

Picture of 'Associate Professor Mark Nielsen'
Associate Professor Mark Nielsen
Research Activities:

I am interested in a range of inter-related aspects of socio-cognitive development  in young human children and nonhuman primates. At present my research is primarily focused on charting the origins and development of human cultural cognition. 

Representative Publications:

In Press

Nielsen, M., Tomaselli, K., Mushin, I., & Whiten, A. (accepted 14/04/2014). Exploring tool innovation: A comparison of Western and Bushman children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology

Nielsen, M., Tomaselli, K., Mushin, I., & Whiten, A. (accepted 27/03/2014). Where culture takes hold: ‘overimitation’ and its flexible deployment in Western, Aboriginal and Bushmen children. Child Development

Shahaeian, A., Nielsen, M., Peterson, C. C., Aboutalebi, M., & Slaughter, V. (accepted 28/07/2014). Knowledge and belief understanding among Iranian and Australian preschool children. The Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

Tear, M., & Nielsen, M. (accepted 13/03/2014). Video games and prosocial behavior: A study of the effects of non-violent, violent and ultra-violent gameplay. Computers in Human Behavior

Cowan, D. G., Vanman, E. J., & Nielsen, M. (in press). Motivated empathy: The mechanics of the empathic gaze. Cognition and Emotion.

Nielsen, M. The role of pretend play in cognitive development during infancy and early childhood and cultural variations. In J Wright (Ed.), International Encylopedia of Social & Behavioral Science (2nd edition). Oxford UK: Elsevier.

Shahaeian, A., Nielsen, M., Peterson, C. C., & Slaughter, V. (in press). Iranian mothers’ disciplinary strategies and theory of mind in children: a focus on belief understanding. The Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology

Shahaeian, A., Nielsen, M., Peterson, C. C., & Slaughter, V. (2014). Cultural and family influences on children’s theory of mind development: A comparison of Australian and Iranian school-age children. The Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 45, 555-568

2013

Oostenbroek, J., Slaughter, V., Nielsen, M., & Suddendorf, T. (2013). Why the confusion around neonatal imitation?: A Review. Journal of Reproductive and Infant Psychology, 31, 328-341

Tear, M. J., & Nielsen, M. (2013). Failure to demonstrate that playing violent video games diminishes prosocial behavior. PLoS One, 8, e68382.

Suddendorf, T., Oostenbroek, J., Nielsen, M., Slaughter, V. (2013). Is newborn imitation developmentally homologous to later social-cognitive skills? Developmental Psychobiology, 55, 52-58

Nielsen, M. (2013). Young children’s imitative and innovative behavior on the floating object task. Infant and Child Development, 22,44-52.

Nielsen, M., Slaughter, V. and Dissanayake, C. (2013), Object-directed imitation in children with high-functioning autism: Testing the social motivation hypothesis. Autism Research, 6, 23-32.

2012

Zmyj, N., Daum, M. M., Prinz, W., Nielsen, M., Aschersleben, G. (2012). Fourteen-month-olds’ imitation of differently aged models. Infant and Child Development, 21, 250-266

Nielsen, M., Subiaul, F., Whiten, A., Galef, B., & Zentall, T. (2012). Social learning in humans and non-human animals: Theoretical and empirical dissections. Journal of Comparative Psychology, 126, 109-113.

Nielsen, M., Moore, C., & Mohamedally, J. (2012). Young children overimitate in third-party contexts. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 112, 73-83..

Nielsen, M. (2012). Childhood and advances in human tool use. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 35, 30-31.

Nielsen, M. (2012). Imitation, pretend play and childhood: Essential elements in the evolution of human culture? Journal of Comparative Psychology, 126, 170-181.

Nielsen, M., Cucchiaro, J., & Mohamedally. (2012). When the transmission of culture is child’s play. PLoS ONE, 7, e34066

Fletcher, R., & Nielsen, M. (2012). Product-based television and young children's pretend play in Australia. Journal of Children and Media, 6, 5-17.


2011

Nielsen, M., & Blank, C. (2011). Imitation in young children: When who gets copied is more important than what gets copied. Developmental Psychology,47, 1050-1053


Suddendorf, T., Nielsen, M., & van Gehlen, R. (2011). Children’s capacity to remember a novel problem and to secure its future solution. Developmental Science,14, 26-33


Nielsen, M. & Widjojo, E. (2011). Failure to find over-imitation in captive orangutans (Pongo pygmaeus): Implications for our understanding of cross-generation information transfer. In J Håkansson (Ed.), Developmental Psychology (pp.153-167). New York NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.


2010

Nielsen, M., & Tomaselli, K. (2010). Over-imitation in Kalahari Bushman children and the origins of human cultural cognition. Psychological Science,21, 729-736


Nielsen, M., & Hudry, K. (2010). Over-imitation in children with Autism and Down syndrome. Australian Journal of Psychology,62, 67-74.


   *For a free copy go here: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/MEz2sR5KuSWYPfcZFeej/full

2009

Nielsen, M. (2009). The imitative behaviour of children and chimpanzees: A window on the transmission of cultural traditions.Revue de primatologie[on line], 1, document 5. URL : http://primatologie.revues.org/254


Nielsen, M. (2009). 12-month-olds produce others’ intended but unfulfilled acts. Infancy,14, 377-389.


   *For free copy go here: http://www.tandfonline.com/eprint/srtczH27tgSaaPCic4Uw/full

2008

Carpenter, M. & Nielsen, M. (2008). Tools, TV and trust: Introduction to the special issue on imitation in typically developing children. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology,101, 225-227.


Nielsen, M., & Carpenter, M. (2008). Reflecting on imitation in autism. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology,101, 165-169.


Nielsen, M., Simcock, G., & Jenkins, L. (2008). The effect of social engagement on 24-month-olds’ imitation from live and televised models. Developmental Science,11, 722-731.


Nielsen, M., & Christie, T. (2008). Adult modelling facilitates young children’s generation of novel pretend acts. Infant and Child Development,17, 151-162.


Nielsen, M. (2008). The social motivation for social learning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences,31, 33.


Slaughter, V., Nielsen, M., & Enchelmaier, P. (2008). Interacting socially with human hands at 24 months of age. Infancy,13, 185-195.


2007+

Suddendorf, T., Simcock, G., & Nielsen, M. (2007). Visual self-recognition in mirrors and live videos: Evidence for a developmental asynchrony. Cognitive Development,22, 185-196.


Nielsen M., & Slaughter, V. (2007). Multiple motivations for imitation in infancy. In K. Dautenhahn & C. L. Nehaniv (Eds.), Imitation and Social Learning in Robots, Humans and Animals: Behavioural, Social and Communicative Dimensions (pp. 343-360). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.


Nielsen, M. (2006). Copying actions and copying outcomes: Social learning through the second year. Developmental Psychology,42, 555-565.


Nielsen, M., Suddendorf, T., & Slaughter, V. (2006). Mirror self-recognition beyond the face. Child Development,77, 176-185


Collier-Baker, E., Davis, J. M., Nielsen, M., & Suddendorf, T. (2006). Do chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) understand single invisible displacement? Animal Cognition,9, 55-61.


Randell, A., & Nielsen, M. (2006). Children’s communication of pretend acts using social cues. In M. A. Vanchevsky (Ed.), Frontiers in Cognitive Psychology (pp. 127-143). New York NY: Nova Science Publishers, Inc.


Nielsen, M., Suddendorf, T., & Dissanayake, C. (2006). Imitation and self-recognition in autism: In search of an explanation. In S. J. Rogers & J. H. G. Williams (Eds.),Imitation and the social mind: Autism and typical development (pp. 138-156). New York NY: Guilford Press.


Nielsen, M., Collier-Baker, E., Davis, J. M., & Suddendorf, T. (2005) Imitation recognition in a captive chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes). Animal Cognition,8, 31-36.


Nielsen, M., & Dissanayake, C. (2004). Imitation, pretend play and mirror self-recognition: A longitudinal investigation through the second year. Infant Behavior and Development, 27, 342-365.


Nielsen, M., & Dissanayake, C. (2003). A longitudinal study of immediate, deferred, and synchronic imitation through the second year. The Interdisciplinary Journal of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour,1, 305-318.


Nielsen, M., Dissanayake, C. A. &  Kashima, Y. (2003). A longitudinal investigation of self-other discrimination and the emergence of mirror self-recognition. Infant Behavior and Development,26, 213-226.


Nielsen, M., & Dissanayake, C. A. (2003). Synchronic imitation as pre-linguistic social interaction. In K. Dautenhan and C. L. Nehaniv (Eds.) Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Imitation in Animals and Artifacts (pp. 131-137). Wales, UK: The Society of Artificial Intelligence and the Simulation of Behaviour.


Nielsen, M., & Dissanayake, C. (2001). A study of pretend play and false belief in pre-school children: Is all pretence metarepresentational? In S. Reifel (Ed.) Theory in context and out (pp. 199-215). Westport CT: Greenwood Publishing Group.


Nielsen, M., & Dissanayake, C. (2000). An investigation of pretend play, mental state terms, and false belief understanding: In search of a metarepresentational link. British Journal of Developmental Psychology,18, 609-624.


Nielsen, M., & Day, R. H. (1999). William James and the evolution of consciousness. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology, 19, 90-113

Course Coordinator:
  • Semester 1, 2014
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 1, 2014
    PSYC3282 - Developmental Perspectives on the Origins of Human Culture
  • Semester 1, 2013
    PSYC3282 - Developmental Perspectives on the Origins of Human Culture
  • Semester 2, 2013
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 1, 2012
    PSYC3282 - Developmental Perspectives on the Origins of Human Culture
  • Semester 2, 2012
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 1, 2011
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 1, 2011
    PSYC3282 - Developmental Perspectives on the Origins of Human Culture
  • Semester 1, 2010
    PSYC3282 - Developmental Perspectives on the Origins of Human Culture
  • Semester 1, 2010
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 1, 2009
    PSYC3282 - Developmental Perspectives on the Origins of Human Culture
  • Semester 1, 2009
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology
  • Semester 2, 2009
    PSYC2030 - Developmental Psychology

Note: Coordinator roles prior to 2009 and tutor roles prior to 2006 are not included.

Research Area:
Developmental Psychology
Synopsis:

Students who work with me undertake projects that typically focus on the development of social-cognitive skills with a broad view on their possible role in young children’s attainment and transmission of culturally bound behaviours.

Some broad project ideas for 2014 include (but are not limited to):

  • Children's developing tool-use skills
  • The social acquisition of moral norms
  • Children's recognition and understanding of ritual
  • The complementary and conflicting roles of imitation and innovation in the development and transmission of cultural and functional behaviour

 

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