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Special Ageing Seminar

Special Ageing Seminar
Start:
Thursday, 30th November 2006

Associate Professor Glynda Kinsella of La Trobe University will be giving a lecture later this week, sponsored by the APS Neuropsychology group. Bio plus abstract are as below - save the date if you are interested in attending!

BRIEF BIOGRAPHY FOR GLYNDA KINSELLA
Glynda Kinsella is an Associate Professor in psychological Science, La Trobe University, Melbourne, where she also co-ordinates the Postgraduate Training Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology. Her research focus relates to the consequences of neuropsychological impairment for the individual and his/her family or caregivers. Her recent research has centred on evaluation of the neuropsychological changes associated with healthy cognitive aging and in the early stages of Alzheimer's disease, including evaluation of interventions for these early cognitive changes.

LECTURE SUMMARY
Remembering to Remember in Healthy Aging, Mild Cognitive Impairment and Mild Alzheimer's Disease.
Memory problems, acknowledged as an early index of dementia, are also a source of frequent complaint in healthy older adults; and, prospective memory, or the timely remembering of a planned action, can be the most troublesome feature of slips in everyday memory. However, in the first study that I will present, healthy older adults can encouragingly demonstrate an age-related advantage on performing prospective memory in naturalistic settings although this advantage is moderated as the attention demand or the complexity of the task increases. In the second study within a laboratory-setting, we manipulated the prospective memory task to challenge cognitive resources and minimised environmental support. Under these conditions we found that not only do healthy older adults struggle to perform as accurately as younger participants but also older adults with mild cognitive impairment demonstrate a significant profile of impairment.
This is interpretable within a model of subtle deficits in

Accessed: 12161 times
Created: Tuesday, 28th November 2006 by windowl
Modified: Thursday, 18th February 2010 by admin
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