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PhD Confirmation Seminars

PhD Confirmation Seminars
Start:
Wednesday, 22nd October 2008

Speaker: Kimberley McFarlane
Date & Time: October 22nd (Wednesday) at 10am
Location: Rm 306, McElwain Building
Talk Title: "The Binding Process in Memory"

Abstract: An important component of episodic memory is the formation of associations, or bindings, between individual items and contextual information. This research aims to examine ‘incidental’ binding for paired associates in which strategies are not used to assist the binding process. Strategy utilization during traditional paired associate tasks represents one of the biggest limitations in studying binding as it prevents direct investigation into how paired associate binding occurs in a non-effortful or “automatic” way. As a result, in this research a maintenance-rehearsal paradigm will be employed in which participants rehearse paired words between digit study and test during a series of short digit recall trials; they are led to believe that the words are included to distract from the primary task of remembering the digits. Previous research using the paradigm has indicated that participants do not use strategies for remembering the paired words and that adequate learning for the pairs is possible when spaced rehearsal is provided (i.e., when a pair is rehearsed over multiple digit recall trials). It also appears that the digit recall data provides a measure for whether or not a binding is being encoded for a particular pair. A series of studies intended to build upon this research is proposed and results from a preliminary study investigating age-related differences in the binding process using this paradigm will be presented in this talk.
Speaker: Sarah Forbes
Talk Title: "The building blocks of fear: Can features attract a preferential response?"
Details: Wednesday, 22nd October, at 3pm, in room 302.

Abstract:
Fear is a naturally occurring response in higher life forms. The human response to fear is so rapid, it can occur

Accessed: 9771 times
Created: Friday, 10th October 2008 by windowl
Modified: Thursday, 5th August 2010 by admin
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