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Faces, fluency, and fingerprints

Faces, fluency, and fingerprints
Location:
Social Sciences Building - S402
Start:
3:00pm Friday, 23rd September 2011
Finish:
4:00pm Friday, 23rd September 2011

 

In Friday's seminar, Jason will discuss three different research projects: (1) A novel face distortion effect, (2) the role of (dis)fluency in teaching and learning, and (3) some recent experiments on fingerprint identification.

 

1. Tangen, Murphy, and Thompson (2011) have recently describe a "Flashed Face Distortion Effect", which has been received a fair bit of attention on YouTube over the last few months. Tangen and his students have conducted several experiments since to better understand the underlying mechanisms.

 

 

2. Tangen et al (2011) examined the effect of visual fluency on interest and learning in slideware (e.g., Powerpoint) presentations. University lectures are beginning to resemble cinematic experiences rather than the text-based transactions that have been the norm for the last decade. Are people more interested in bullet point or image rich presentations? Do images need to be relevant to the topic? 

 

3. Tangen, Thompson, and McCarthy (2011) conducted the first properly controlled experiment examining the expertise of fingerprint examiners. The issue is no longer whether fingerprint examiners make errors, but rather how to acknowledge them, how to develop a culture of cooperation with experts, and how to better understand the nature of expertise in identification.

 

Shocking illusion - Pretty girls turn ugly! (YouTube Clip)

 

 

 

 

Accessed: 2138 times
Created: Monday, 19th September 2011 by goodwinh
Modified: Monday, 19th September 2011 by goodwinh
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