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Psychonomic Seminar Series

Psychonomic Seminar Series
Start:
Friday, 31st March 2006

The School of Psychology proudly presents:
The Psychonomic Seminar Series 2006
“Wobbling the flabby midriff of systematic observation until the belly
button piercing of theoretical cohesion is dislodged”
This coming Friday 31th March at 3pm in room 306, Psychology, the
unsurpassed Ashley Phelan will demonstrate his ability to keep five ping
pong balls in the air while drinking a glass of milk. Previous to this,
he will talk about:
Attention Deficits in Male Football Players: The Long Term Consequences
of Repetitive Football Heading
Abstract:
Research has found reduced perfomance by footballers (soccer players) on
a host of neuropsychological tests and the cause of this is unknown. The
aim of the present study is to investigate attention processes in
retired players at both the professional and amateur levels and the role
repetitive heading may have have on these functions.
This is Ashley’s autobiography in his own words, as recorded for ABC’s
‘Australian Story’ in 1978:
“Born in the industrial North of England where you don’t cut the grass,
you wash it. I spent my youth dodging truancy officers while playing
football in the streets. I have spent the remaining 25 years dodging
responsibility by travelling the world with one pair of socks and an old
leather football. Coming from the home of professional football
(Sheffield) and the people who brought the world the cross bar and
purposeful heading, it seems fitting that I investigate the long term
neuropsychological implications of purposeful heading in semi
professional and amateur footballers.”

Accessed: 11796 times
Created: Thursday, 30th March 2006 by windowl
Modified: Thursday, 5th August 2010 by admin
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