School of Psychology - Directory - People - Dr Eric Vanman

Dr Eric Vanman
  – Senior Lecturer

Picture of 'Dr Eric Vanman'
Dr Eric Vanman
Eric joined the School in 2007 having held various academic positions in several American universities, with the most recent Georgia State. His research interests include the social neuroscience of emotion and intergroup prejudice and he is particularly known for his research on racial prejudice. His work on unconscious bias displayed via psychophysiological measures was among a few early studies that laid the groundwork for research on implicit measures.
Room:
MC-465
Email:
Phone:
+61 7 3365 6213
Fax:
+61 7 3365 4466
Webpage:
Postal Address:

School of Psychology
McElwain Building, Level 3
University of Queensland
St Lucia, QLD 4072
AUSTRALIA


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Picture of 'Dr Eric Vanman'
Dr Eric Vanman
Qualifications:

B.S., University of Iowa.  M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California

Background:

Eric J. Vanman is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Psychology at the University of Queensland Australia. After receiving his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of Southern California in 1994, he was a post-doctoral fellow in cognitive and behavioral neuroscience at USC and then spent a year as a research scientist at Texas A&M University. He was then a lecturer at Emory University until his appointment as an Assistant Professor at Georgia State University in 2000. He left Georgia State in 2007 as an Associate Professor to take up his current position. His research interests include the social neuroscience of emotion and intergroup prejudice, and his studies have incorporated several kinds of psychophysiological and neuroimaging methods.

Dr. Vanman is perhaps best known for his research on racial prejudice, in which participants’ facial EMG activity (i.e., activation of frowning and smiling muscles, in the absence of detectable facial displays of emotion) has been found to be related to prejudice and discriminatory behavior. His work on unconscious bias displayed via psychophysiological measures was among a few early studies that laid the groundwork for research on implicit measures that has dominated this research area for the last decade.

Professional Activities:

Associate Editor, Biological Psychology

Associate Editor, Cognition and Emotion

Editorial Board, Social Neuroscience

Co-chair, Education & Training Committee, Society for Social Neuroscience

 

Picture of 'Dr Eric Vanman'
Dr Eric Vanman
Representative Publications:

Journal Articles

Books/Monographs/Chapters

  • Vanman, E. J., & Miller, N. (1993). Applications of emotion theory and research to stereotyping and intergroup relations. In D. M. Mackie & D. L. Hamilton (Eds.), Affect, cognition, and stereotyping: Interactive processes in group perception (pp. 213-238). Orlando, FL: Academic Press.
  • Miller, N., Urban, L. M., & Vanman, E. J. (1997). A theoretical analysis of crossed categorization effects. In C. Sedikides, J. Schopler, & C. A. Inkso (Eds.), Intergroup cognition and intergroup behavior (pp. 394-420). Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.
  • Putnam, L., & Vanman, E. J. (1999). Long lead interval startle modification. In M. E. Dawson, A. M. Schell, & A. H. Boehmelt (Eds.), Startle modification: Implications for neuroscience, cognitive science, and clinical science (pp. 72-92). New York: Cambridge University Press.
  • Brennan, P. A., Grekin, E. R., & Vanman, E. J. (2000). Major mental disorders and crime in the community: A focus on patient populations and cohort investigations. In S. Hodgins (Ed.), Effective prevention of crime and violence among persons with major mental disorder (pp. 3-18). New York: Plenum.
  • Vanman, E. J. (2006). Test bank for Breckler, Olson, and Wiggins’ Social Psychology Alive. Belmont, CA: Thomson-Learning. 
  • Tassinary, L.G., Cacioppo, J.T., & Vanman, E.J. (2007). The skeletomotor system: Surface electromyography. J.T. Cacioppo, L.G. Tassinary, & G.G. Berntson (Eds.), Handbook of Psychophysiology (3rd ed.).
  • Blascovich, J., Mendes, W. B., Vanman, E. J., & Dickerson, S. (2011). Social psychophysiology for personality and social psychology. Los Angeles, CA: Sage.
  • Owren, Michael J.Philipp, MichaelVanman, EricTrivedi, NiyatiSchulman, Allison & Bachorowski, Jo-Anne (2013).Understanding spontaneous human laughter: the role of voicing in inducing positive emotion. In Evolution of emotional communication: from sounds in nonhuman mammals to speech and music in man (pp. 175-190) Oxford, United Kingdom: Oxford University Press.
Course Coordinator:
  • Semester 1, 2017
    PSYC1040 - Psychological Research Methodology I
  • Semester 1, 2017
    PSYC4981 - Current Issues in Psychology I
  • Semester 1, 2016
    PSYC4981 - Current Issues in Psychology I
  • Semester 2, 2016
    PSYC1040 - Psychological Research Methodology I
  • Semester 2, 2016
    PSYC3272 - The Neuroscience of Social Behaviour
  • Semester 2, 2015
    PSYC1040 - Psychological Research Methodology I
  • Semester 2, 2015
    PSYC3272 - The Neuroscience of Social Behaviour
  • Semester 1, 2014
    PSYC1040 - Psychological Research Methodology I
  • Semester 1, 2014
    PSYC4982 - Current Issues in Psychology II
  • Semester 1, 2013
    PSYC1040 - Psychological Research Methodology I
  • Semester 1, 2013
    PSYC3272 - The Neuroscience of Social Behaviour
  • Semester 2, 2012
    PSYC3272 - The Neuroscience of Social Behaviour
  • Semester 2, 2011
    PSYC3272 - The Neuroscience of Social Behaviour
  • Semester 1, 2010
    PSYC3222 - Psychophysiology: Methods and Applications
  • Semester 2, 2010
    PSYC2050 - Learning and Cognition
  • Semester 2, 2010
    PSYC3272 - The Neuroscience of Social Behaviour
  • Semester 1, 2009
    PSYC2050 - Learning and Cognition
  • Semester 1, 2009
    PSYC3222 - Psychophysiology: Methods and Applications
  • Semester 2, 2009
    PSYC3272 - The Neuroscience of Social Behaviour

Note: Coordinator roles prior to 2009 and tutor roles prior to 2006 are not included.

Research Area:
Social Behaviour
Synopsis:

I will be supervising at least four honours students in 2017.

In the UQ Social Neuroscience Lab, we use various psychophysiological measures to examine emotional and cognitive processes involved in social interactions.  Although informed by recent findings in neuroimaging, honours projects are typically done without people being put into a fMRI scanner.  To heighten experimental realism, the laboratory has available interactive software programs so that participants become highly involved in the experimental procedures.  Recent studies conducted by students in the lab have examined the effects of being the source or target of ostracism, implicit prejudice and discrimination, trust and motor mimicry, event-related potentials and guilt, and Facebook use. Honours students are required to attend weekly lab meetings with my PhD students and other research assistants, in addition to having individual supervision appointments.

In 2017, my honours students will be focusing on the situational factors that cause us to have more or less empathy for another person. These factors might include the facial expression of the other person, their age or race, how trustworthy they appear, their "story", etc. Each thesis project will involve learning how to record facial EMG (muscle activity from the face) and possibly other physiological measures. All projects will be "pre-registered" at the Open Science Framework site. 

What about my honours supervision style? I realise that most new honours students are undertaking their first big research project, so early on I try to help them develop a realistic time schedule with a set of goals that we assess at our weekly individual meetings. Once data collection has begun, we meet individually less often, and but start to meet more often again when it's time to analyse the data. By the end of the year, I hope that my students feel that they can work more independently. I also like to improve students' writing skills whenever possible, so some of our lab meetings will cover those skills as well. To this end, each student will receive their own copy of the APA publication manual! 

Please be sure to contact me if you have any questions. Unfortunately, I will miss the meet & greet session in January, but will be back in the country and free to meet with you on the afternoon of the 27th.

Cheers,

Eric

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