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Associate Professor Judith Murray
  – Director Master of Counselling Program

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Associate Professor Judith Murray
Judith holds teaching and nursing qualifications as well as a PhD in Psychology. From 1996 to 2003 she established a Loss and Grief Unit at the Centre for Primary Health Care in the School of Population Health at UQ and was the Program Director of the Graduate Health Studies Program. She followed this with the establishment of the Master of Counselling program, serving as inaugural Program Director, and was involved in the development of the Counselling stream in the Master of Applied Psychology. She currently holds a joint, part-time position as Associate Professor in Counselling and Counselling Psychology with Psychology and the School of NMSW at UQ, and works part-time as a Registered Nurse in Haematology and Oncology at PAH. Her research focus has been in reactions to bereavement and other situations of loss.
Room:
MC-405
Email:
Phone:
+61 7 3365 7181
Fax:
+61 7 3365 4466
Postal Address:

Level 4
McElwain Psychology Building
The University of QLD
St Lucia QLD 4072


Picture of 'Associate Professor Judith Murray'
Associate Professor Judith Murray
Qualifications:

 

PhD (Psychology and Child Health)

Bachelor of Nursing

Bachelor of Arts (First Class Honours – Psychology)

Bachelor of Educational Studies

Diploma in Education

Bachelor of Arts(Majors in Mathematics, Psychology & History)

Background:

Judith initially gained a BA and Diploma of Education in Mathematics and History. While teaching in QLD secondary schools for five years, she completed a BEdSt. She completed First Class Honours in psychology and later a PhD which focused on community interventions with bereaved families. In 2006 Judith completed a Bachelor of Nursing. From 1996-2003 she established a Loss and Grief Unit at the Centre for Primary Health Care in the School of Population Health at The University of Queensland that advanced the concept of loss in the care of those faced with adverse life events. The Unit was involved with community resource development and education, training for professionals, research, grief counselling, and post-graduate education in loss and grief. From 2000-2003, she was also Chair of the Graduate Health Studies Program of the School of Population Health. From 2004-2010 Judith was involved in the establishemnet of, and was the original Program Director of, the Master of Counselling program. She was also during this time  was involved in the development of the Master of Applied Psychology (Counselling). From 2010 Judith has moved to a part time position as Associate Professor in Counselling and Counselling Psychology at UQ as welll as working as a Registered Nurse in Haematology and Oncology.

Professional Activities:

Part time joint appointment between School of Psychology and School of Social Work and Applied Human Sciences as Lecturer, Master of Counselling Program.

Part time Registered Nurse

Picture of 'Associate Professor Judith Murray'
Associate Professor Judith Murray
Research Activities:

Major themes of research have been in the area of reactions to bereavement and other situations of loss, and the development and evaluation of interventions to enhance mental well-being. Current areas of research interest and activities include:

.Longitudinal development of counselling trainees

.Multidsiciplinary training for psychological and spiritual care in palliative care 

.The development of a scale to measure perceived ability and atttitude to provide support

.Longitudinal study of the effects of infant death

·Longitudinal evaluation of a selective intervention program designed to provide support for families affected by infant death

.Adolescent perceptions and the effects on children’s emotional development of a family crisis event during early childhood

.Evaluation of multidisciplinary training programs for enhancing the care of children and adults affected by adverse life events

Representative Publications:

Books

Murray, J.A. (1989) (Revised, 2003) Personal Grieving. Adelaide: Open Book Publishing.
Murray, J.A. and Murray M.J. (1988) When the Dream is Shattered: Coping with Child Bearing Difficulties. Adelaide: L.P.H.

Book Chapters

Forster, E., & Murray, J. (2007) Loss and grief. In M. Barnes & J. Rowe (Eds.) Child, youth and family health: Strengthening communities. (pp. 189-205). Sydney: Elsevier.

Mitchell, G., Murray, J., & Hinton, J. (2007) Understanding the whole person: Life-limiting illness across the life cycle. In: G. Mitchell (Ed.). Palliative care: A patient-centered approach. Abingdon: Radcliffe Medical.

Murray, J.A.(2005).  A psychology of loss: A potentially integrating psychology for the future study of adverse life events. New Approaches to Psychology. New York: Nova Sciences.


Murray, J.A. (2003) Loss and Grief. In V. O’Connor & G. Kovacs (Ed.) Obstetrics, Gynaecology and Women’s Health. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. Pp. 135-139.

Murray, J.A. (2001) To Honour their Gift. In McLean, G. (Ed.) Loss and Grief: Our Stories. Narellan, NSW: Rose Education. Pp. 9-15.

Journal Articles

Meredith, P., Murray, J., Wilson, T., Mitchell, G., & Hutch, R. (2012). Can spirituality be taught to health care professionals? has now been published in the following paginated issue of Journal of Religion and Health, 51 (3), 879-889.

Richardson, M., Cobham, V., Murray, J., & McDermott, B. (2010). Parents’ grief in the context of adult child mental illness: a qualitative review. Clinical Child and Famiily Psychological Review, DOI 10.1007/s10567-010-0075-y. Published Online 20 July 2010. http://www.springerlink.com/content/f95475505j583433/.

Meredith, P., Murray, J., Wilson, T., Mitchell, G., & Hutch, R. (2010). Can spirituality be taught to health care professionals? Journal of Religion and Health, DOI 10.1007/s10943-010-9399-7. Published Online 1 October 2010. http://www.springerlink.com.ezproxy.library.uq.edu.au/content/n86uxv2j5887p5t6/fulltext.pdf

Mitchell, G., Murray, J., Wilson, P., Hutch, R, & Meredith, P. (2010). ‘Diagnosing’ and ‘managing’ spiritual distress in palliative care: Creating an intellectual framework for spirituality useable in clinical practice. Australasian Medical Journal AMJ, 3(6), 364-369.

Murray, J. (2005) Children, young people and mental health: Confusion in the ranks, Confusion among the commanders. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 15(2), 182-194.

Murray, J. (2004). Editorial. Grief Matters. 7(2), p.27.
Murray, J. (2004) Making Sense of Resilience: A Useful Step on the Road to Creating and Maintaining Resilient Students and School Communities. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling.14(1), 1-15.
Murray, J.A. (2002) Communicating with the community about grieving: A description and review of the foundations of the Broken Leg Analogy of Grieving. Journal of Loss and Trauma. 7, 47-69.
Murray, J.A. (2001) Book Review: Handbook of Bereavement Research: Consequences, Coping and Care. Grief Matters, 4(2), 34.
Murray, J.A. (2001) Loss as a universal concept: A review of the literature to identify common aspects of loss in diverse situations. Journal of Loss and Trauma. 6, 219-241.
Murray, J.A., Terry, D.J., Vance, J.C., Battistutta, D. & Connolly, Y. (2001). Effects of a primary health care intervention on parents affected by infant death. Neonatal Intensive Care, (Part I), 14(3), 58-68, (Part 2), 14(4), 43-46.
Murray, J.A. (2000) Understanding loss in the lives of children and adolescents: A contribution to the promotion of wellbeing among the young. Australian Journal of Guidance and Counselling, 10(1), 95-109.
Murray, J.A., Terry, D.J., Vance, J.C., Battistutta, D. & Connolly, Y. (2000) Effects of a primary health care intervention on parents affected by infant death. Death Studies, 24(4), 275-305.

Invited Articles for National Newsletters

Murray, J. (2008) Face it. The Lutheran, 42(2), March, pp. 13-14. Murray, J. (2007) “I don’t want to be here and I really don’t want to be doing this.” Focus: Newsletter of the Compassionate Friends NSW Inc. 131, April-June.


Commissioned Reports / Resources Packages

Murray, J., Wilson, T., Meredith, P., Mitchell, G., & Hutch, R. (2007) A Multidisciplinary Training Program for Spiritual Care in Palliative Care. Australian Department of Health and Ageing. Canberra. To be available free of charge on web in December 2007 through www.pallcare.org.au.  

Crowe, L. & Murray, J. (2005) Loss and Grief for Children in Care. Alternate Care Training Module. QLD Dept of Child Safety. Brisbane: QLD Government.

Murray, J.A. (1993) An Ache in their Hearts Resource Package. Brisbane: Department of Child Health, The University of Queensland.

Wilson, T. & Murray, J. (2003) Loss in the Lives of Children and Adolescents: A Self Directed Learning Package for School Based Health Nurses. Brisbane: QLD Health and The University of QLD.

Picture of 'Associate Professor Judith Murray'
Associate Professor Judith Murray
Topics:
Loss, grief issues in general following a death, bereavement, illness, health challenges, suicide, relationship breakdown, children and adolescents, substance abuse and trauma, preventive mental health, counselling practice and education.
Keywords:
Mental health - preventive, Bereavement and psychology, Child psychology, Adolescents and psychology, Teenagers and psychology, Parent-child relationships, Suicide, Parenting, Counselling practice, Psychology, Bereavement, Death - coping with (psychology), Illness - loss and grief (psychology), Alcohol addiction - psychology, Couples therapy, Relationship breakdown, Drug addiction - psychology, Substance abuse - and psychology, Grief issues - psychology

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