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Professor Kenneth Pakenham
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Picture of 'Professor Kenneth Pakenham'
Professor Kenneth Pakenham
Kenneth joined the School of Psychology in 1992 after working as a clinical psychologist in Queensland Health for 12 years. His research and clinical practice in psychology spans over 30 years. Inspired by the resilience of some people with serious illnesses, he has committed much of his career to investigating the processes that foster personal growth in the context of health adversities, and to translating his findings into interventions that help people live fully with illness. This passion has driven his empirical, theoretical and translational research, curriculum development, and clinical training and supervision. Importantly, his work has included not only the person with chronic illness, but also his or her network, particularly the carer. Through more than 130 publications, over 60 conference presentations, and more than 2 million dollars of competitive grant funding, he has become a leader in the application of positive health frameworks to several chronic illnesses, and to caregiving in these contexts. His research has been widely cited: >2300 SCOPUS citations and >4,000 Google Scholar citations. His research has helped to inform government policies, particularly those related to carers, and establish interventions and assessment protocols within government and community services. The “living fully with illness” theme integrates his early research in stress/coping theory, his mid-career shift to incorporate the rise of positive psychology, and his current and future focus on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Using ACT to extend his research on living fully with illness has also invigorated his teaching. He developed the first ACT university course in Australia. This course integrates training in therapist competencies and self-care skills and shows published empirical evidence of fostering competent and resilient clinicians. Through peer reviewed publications, conference and keynote presentations, and three university teaching awards, he has become a leader in integrating training in therapist and self-care competencies into clinical psychology curricula using an ACT framework. He has received a total of 5 teaching awards. He and a colleague developed an ACT based resilience training program called READY which received the UQ Trailblazer Award in recognition of its innovation and potential for commercialization and for benefiting the community. In 2016 he received a UQ Partner In Research Excellence Award for his partnership with Multiple Sclerosis Qld and the evaluation and delivery of a mindfulness program for people with multiple sclerosis throughout the state. He has supervised the postgraduate research of 55 students (including 16 PhD students). He has served in many influential professional roles including: Chair of the Registration Committee of the Psychologists Board of Queensland for over 10 years, Director of The University of Queensland Psychology Clinic for 7 years, Honours Convenor for 3 years, and member of the editorial boards for six international journals.
Room:
MC-326
Email:
Phone:
+61 7 3365 6677
Fax:
+61 7 3365 4466
Postal Address:

School of Psychology
The University of Queensland
Brisbane
Queensland 4072
Austrailia


Picture of 'Professor Kenneth Pakenham'
Professor Kenneth Pakenham
Qualifications:

PhD, The University of Queensland 1993

Master of Applied Psychology (clin), University of Qld 1986

Master of Arts (Hons), University of NSW 1979

Bachelor of Arts, University of Qld, 1978

Background:

I joined the School of Psychology in 1992 after working as a clinical psychologist in Qld Health for 12 years. During this time I worked with children and adults with a range of problems (including schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety, depression and eating disorders). I have practiced clinical psychology in a range of settings including acute psychiatric admission units, general medical wards, long stay institutions, community mental health centres and in private practice. As well as teaching clinical psychology, I continue to practice clinical psychology and consult with community and government agencies.

Professional Activities:

Editorial Board member Psychology and Health

Editorial Board member Rehabilitation Psychology

Editorial Board member Health Psychology Review

Editorial Board member Stress and Health

Editorial Board member Research in Autistic Spectrum Disorders

Principal Researcher, Social & Applied Research Centre for the MS Australia Research Institute

Member APS College of Clinical Psychologists

Member APS College of Health Psychologists

Registered Psychologist with clinical and health psychology endorsements

Picture of 'Professor Kenneth Pakenham'
Professor Kenneth Pakenham
Research Activities:

My research interests are in the areas of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), positive psychology and clinical health psychology. My specific research interests include: the application of ACT to specific populations, and investigation into adaptation to negative or stressful life events particularly using stress and coping frameworks. Particular negative or stressful life events of interest include chronic illness (e.g., Multiple Sclerosis, AIDS, cancer, heart disease), and caregiving. I am interested in both the physiological and psychological processes involved in the adaptation process for the person directly affected by the stressful event and significant others (carers). I have a 3 year ARC funded project that is examining the psychosocial impact of caring for a parent with an illness or disability and am involved in numerous other funded projects.

Representative Publications:

Book Chapters

Pakenham, K. I. (In press). Multiple Sclerosis. In Kennedy, P. (Ed.)
The Oxford Handbook of Rehabilitation Psychology. NY: Oxford University Press.

Pakenham, K. I. & Finlayson, M. (In press). Caregiving. In Finlayson, M. (Ed.)  Multiple Sclerosis Rehabilitation: From Impairment to Participation. NY: Taylor & Francis Publishing.

Pakenham, K. I. (In press). Coping with MS. In Finlayson, M. (Ed.)  Multiple Sclerosis Rehabilitation: From
Impairment to Participatio
n. NY: Taylor & Francis Publishing.

Pakenham, K. I. (2011). Benefit finding and sense making in chronic illness. In Folkman, S. (Ed.). Oxford Handbook on Stress, Coping, and
Health,
(pp. 242-268). NY: Oxford University Press.

Pakenham, K. I. (2009). Children who care for their parents: the impact of disability on young lives. In Marshall, C.A., Kendall, E., Banks, M., & Gover, R.M.S. (Eds.) Disability: Insights From Across Fields and Around the World, Vol II, (pp. 39-60). Westport, CT:
Praeger Press.

Refereed Journal Articles

Pakenham K I. & Cox S (In press, accepted 29/09/11). Test of a model of the effects of parental illness on youth and family functioning. Health Psychology.

Pakenham K I. & Cox S (In press, accepted 15/02/11).  The nature of caregiving in
children of a parent with multiple sclerosis from multiple sources and the
associations between caregiving activities and youth adjustment overtime. Psychology and Health

Pakenham K. I. (In press, accepted 11/02/11). Caregiving tasks in caring for an adult with mental illness and associations with adjustment outcomes, International
Journal of Behavioral Medicine

Rinaldis, M., Pakenham, K.I. & Lynch, B.  (In press; accepted 10/03/10). A structural model of the relationships among stress, coping, benefit finding and quality of life
in persons diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Psychology and Health.

Pakenham, K.I. & Fleming, M. (2011). Relations between acceptance of multiple sclerosis and positive and negative adjustment. Psychology and Health, 26 (10), 1292-1309.

Mackay, C. & Pakenham, K. I. (2011). Identification of stress and coping risk and protective factors associated with changes in adjustment to caring for an adult with mental illness. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 67(10), 1064-1079.

Fitzell, A. & Pakenham, K. I. (2010). Application of a stress and coping model to positive and negative adjustment outcomes in colorectal cancer caregiving. Psycho-oncology,
19, 1171-1178.

Ireland, M., & Pakenham, K. I. (2010). The nature of young caregiving in families experiencing chronic illness/disability: Development of the Youth Activities of Caregiving Scale (YACS), Psychology and Health, 25, 713-731.

Hawkes, A.L., Pakenham, K.I., Courneya, K., Gollschewski, S., Baade, P., Gordon, L., Lynch, B.M., Aitken, J., & Chambers, S. (2009). A randomised controlled trial of a lifestyle intervention for colorectal cancer survivors (CanChange): study protocol. BMC Cancer, 9, 286 doi:10.1186/1471-2407-9-286.

Burton, N.W., Pakenham, K.I., & Brown, W.J. (2009). Evaluating the effectiveness of psychosocial resilience training for heart health, and the added value of promoting physical activity: a cluster randomized trial of the READY program. BMC Public Health 9:427 doi:10.1186/1471-2458-9-427.

Shelley, M. & Pakenham, K. I. (2009). Cortisol changes interact with the effects of a cognitive behavioural psychological preparation for surgery on 12-month outcomes for surgical heart patients. Psychology and Health, 24 (10), 1139-1152.

Pakenham, K. I. & Cox, S. (2009). The dimensional structure of benefit finding in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and relations with positive and negative adjustment: A longitudinal study. Psychology and Health, 24, 373-393

Pakenham, K.I. (2007). Making sense of Multiple Sclerosis. Rehabilitation Psychology, 52, 380-389.

Pakenham, K.I. (2007). The nature of caregiving in multiple sclerosis: Development of the Caregiving Tasks in Multiple Sclerosis Scale. Multiple Sclerosis. 13, 929-938.

Shelley, M. & Pakenham, K. I. (2007). The effects of pre-operative preparation on post-operative outcomes: The moderating role of control appraisals. Health Psychology, 26, 83-191.

Pakenham, K. I., Bursnall, S., Chiu, J., Cannon, T., & Okochi,M. (2006). The sychosocial impact of caregiving on young people who have a parent with an illness or disability: comparisons between young caregivers and non-caregivers. Rehabilitation Psychology, 51, 113-126.

Pakenham, K. I. (2005). Benefit finding in Multiple Sclerosis and associations with positive and negative outcomes.  Health Psychology, 24, 123-132.

Pakenham, K. I., Sofronoff, K., & Samios, C. (2004). Finding meaning in parenting a child with Asperger Syndrome: Correlates of sense making and benefit finding. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 25, 245-264

Green, H., Pakenham, K. I, Headley, B., Yaxley, J., Nicol, D., Mactaggart, P., Swanson, C., Watson, R. & Gardiner, R. A., (2004). Quality of life compared during pharmacological treatments and clinical monitoring for non-localised prostate cancer: A randomised controlled trial British Journal of Urology International, 93, 975-979.

Pakenham, K. I. (2001).Coping with multiple sclerosis: Development of a measure. Psychology, Health & Medicine, 6, 411-428.

Clutton, S., Pakenham, K. I., & Buckley, B. (1999). Predictors of well-being following a “false positive” breast screening result.  Psychology and Health, 14, 263-275.

Pakenham, K. I.  (1999). Adjustment to multiple sclerosis: Application of a stress and coping model. Health  Psychology, 18, 383-392.

Pakenham, K. I., Dadds, R. M. & Terry, D. J. (1994).  The relationships between adjustment to HIV and both social support and coping strategies. Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology, 62, 1194-1203.

 

Picture of 'Professor Kenneth Pakenham'
Professor Kenneth Pakenham
Topics:
Clinical health psychology: adjustment and coping with chronic illness. Caregiving including children/adolscents caring for a parent with illness and/or disability. Positive psychology including meaning making processes, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.
Keywords:
Clinical health psychology, chronic illness - coping, chronic illness - adjusting, caregiving - children, Positive psychology, meaning making processes - psychology, disability - carers, illness - carers, carers
Course Coordinator:
  • Semester 1, 2017
    PSYC7191 - Clinical Psychopathology
  • Semester 2, 2017
    PSYC3082 - Psychotherapies and Counselling
  • Semester 2, 2017
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy
  • Semester 2, 2016
    PSYC3082 - Psychotherapies and Counselling
  • Semester 2, 2016
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy
  • Semester 1, 2015
    PSYC3102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2015
    PSYC7191 - Clinical Psychopathology
  • Semester 2, 2015
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy
  • Semester 2, 2014
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy
  • Semester 1, 2013
    PSYC3102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2013
    PSYC7191 - Clinical Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2013
    PSYC4102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 2, 2013
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy
  • Semester 1, 2012
    PSYC3102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2012
    PSYC7191 - Clinical Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2012
    PSYC4102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 2, 2012
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy
  • Semester 1, 2011
    PSYC3102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2011
    PSYC7191 - Clinical Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2011
    PSYC4102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 2, 2011
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy
  • Semester 1, 2010
    PSYC3102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2010
    PSYC7191 - Clinical Psychopathology
  • Semester 1, 2009
    PSYC7191 - Clinical Psychopathology
  • Semester 2, 2009
    PSYC3102 - Psychopathology
  • Semester 2, 2009
    PSYC7241 - Acceptance & Commit Therapy

Note: Coordinator roles prior to 2009 and tutor roles prior to 2006 are not included.

Research Area:
Clinical
Synopsis:

My research interests fall in the field of Clinical and Health Psychology. The frameworks that have guided my research include stress and coping theory, positive psychology, and more recently the "third wave" Cognitive and Behaviour Therapies. I have active research activity in the following areas:

1. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): I am interested in exploring the ACT framework, clinical applications of ACT, and ACT training, particularly with respect to personal applications of ACT for self-care.

2. Mindfulness: specific interests include understanding the mechanisms by which mindfulness has beneficial impacts and clinical applications of mindfulness.

3. Positive Psychology: I am particularly interested in exploring the theoretical understanding and clinical applications of resilience, compassion and self-compassion, hope and meaning making (benefit finding and sense making).

4. Living Fully with Chronic Illness: I have been researching the applications of the above frameworks to living with chronic illness for over 20 years. Illness contexts that my research has explored include both physical (e.g., multiple sclerosis, cancer, heart disease, diabetes) and mental (e.g., Schizophrenia, Asperger's Syndrome) health problems. Importantly my research has included an interpersonal perspective that has included carers or family members.

5. Caregiving: consistent with a biopsychosocial perspective on illness, my research has applied the above frameworks to both the person with a health problem and their carer. I investigate caregiving across the life span including caregiving in children, young adults and older adults.

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